Media Coverage: Urban Design Panel Meeting on 105 Keefer St.

June, 1, 2016:

Roundhouse Radio

 


Roundhouse Radio – Rezoning Opposition says adding a cultural centre to Chinatown “isn’t enough.”

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A rezoning application for 105 Keefer Street is being disputed by a group called the ChinaTown Concern Group.

Organizer King Mong Chan says the plan to build a cultural center is just not enough.

“The cultural space that they are offering now is only 1000 feet, next to the alleyway and it’s only for a 10 year rental agreement. We don’t think that this development is appropriate for that site and something better for the community should be at that site instead.”

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“Space is the place: The history of Philadelphia’s Chinatown”

May, 17, 2016 – News Works

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Despite encroachments by big development projects such as the Vine Street Expressway and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia’s Chinatown has maintained a sense of history and community for more than a century.

But it occupies a tightly confined space in Center City, which has forced new immigrants to settle elsewhere in the region.

“Even if people aren’t settling directly in Chinatown, it’s still the heart — the cultural heart and the symbolic heart — of the community,” said historian Kathryn Wilson. She gained an intimate knowledge of the Chinatown community during her years with the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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“Chinatown development draws criticism”

May, 16, 2016 – Journal of Commerce

A proposed Chinatown development in Vancouver is coming under fire from community members for a third time

Vancouver-based Beedie Group has proposed a third version of a mixed-use development in the city’s historic Chinatown neighbourhood, but the Chinatown Action Group, a coalition of neighbourhood activists, is opposed to what it maintains is a too-low number of social housing units.

The proposed building would have 119 market residential units, 25 senior social housing units, commercial space and a senior’s cultural space.

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“Chinatown Resident Saves Family Store, Launches Series on Changing Nabe”

May, 18, 2016 – DNA Info

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CHINATOWN — Shortly after Chinatown resident Mei Lum succeeded in saving the 90-year-old antique shop that has been in her family for four generations, she decided to take it a step further by launching a community engagement initiative to chat with other local businesses about staying afloat and relevant in the ever-evolving neighborhood.

Lum, now the executive director of Wing on Wo & Co at 26 Mott St., on May 19 will kick off a summer-spanning series of conversations and workshops about changing Chinatown, beginning with a panel discussion with local businesses owners called “The (Re) Generation of Chinatown.”

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“華埠地皮發展 卡市府諮詢民意”

2016-05-25 – 星島日報

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卡加利市政府將於周四舉行首場諮詢會,討論華埠一幅土地重建發展而衍生的長遠規劃爭議等事宜,呼籲民眾參與其中。
市府期望諮詢會能集結社區聲音,讓市府的規劃部門「更瞭解各方的疑慮、(期望的發展)機遇及成果」。
市議會今年4月通過,三度押後審議一幅具爭議的地皮發展項目,並額外製訂「規劃展望報告」(scoping report),以便廣納民意,為華埠規劃發展定下更清晰方向。

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“美華裔新移民選擇住郊外 昔日中國城漸消失”

2016-05-20 – 大紀元

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【大紀元2016年05月20日訊】(大紀元記者梁硯編譯報導)到訪紐約、舊金山或費城這些美國大都市的旅遊者,常會來中國城小坐片刻,嚐嚐那裡的小吃或珍珠茶。這裡也是昔日移居美國的華人,安身立命或尋找鄉情的地方。近二十年來,隨著高收入、高學歷華人移民漸成主流,破舊擁擠的老式中國城正在消失,郊外新興中國城逐漸成為新視野。

據大西洋新聞網18日報導,隨美國華人移民中,高技能、高收入者越來越多,坐落在市中心的老中國城越來越形單影孤。據美國人口統計數據,如今許多中國移民來到美國後,直接選擇在占地寬敞、空氣優質的郊外購房居家,根本不在意中國城可能在語言和食品選擇上為自己帶來的些許便利。他們說,更樂見為自己的孩子找到好學區,也更喜歡郊外舒適的生活環境。

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“Edmonton conference asks how to save North America’s Chinatowns”

May 28, 2016 – Edmonton Sun

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Chinatowns across North America started as gateways for immigrants and turned into thriving hubs for Asian food and culture.

But with rising rents, gentrification, declining resident populations and competition from suburban amenities, the future of many Chinatowns is looking increasingly uncertain.

An international conference coming to Edmonton will ask how to save North America’s Chinatowns.

“Our over-arching question is, ‘Will there be any Chinatowns in the future?” said conference organizer Lan Chan.

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“King-mong Chan of the Chinatown Concern Group within Downtown Eastside/Chinatown Vancouver”

Apr, 30, 2016 –ACCESS TV (Youtube Video)

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35:43-43:28 Power of Youth Award – King-mong Chan of the Chinatown Concern Group within Downtown Eastside/Chinatown Vancouver

“The Great Fall of Chinatown”

May, 23, 2016 – Washingtonian

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Thirty years ago, if you wanted the best Chinese food in the area, you’d go to Chinatown. The DC neighborhood around Sixth and H streets, Northwest, offered a wealth of Szechuan and Cantonese eateries, many of which were regulars on our annual best-restaurants list. You could get your shopping done, too: Markets thrived, and families who’d moved out of the neighborhood would return to stock their kitchens.
Now? The food markets are gone, and if you want the area’s best Chinese food, you go to Rockville.
How did Chinatown become virtually devoid of anything Chinese? By losing most of its Chinese residents. In 1970, there were roughly 3,000; today, the Mayor’s Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs sets that number below 600. Many are elderly residents of two low-income housing developments.

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“Canada’s Most Endangered Places Include Vancouver’s Chinatown”

May, 27, 2016 – The Huffington Post B.C.

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Since 2005, National Trust for Canada has been publishing an annual list of the country’s most endangered places.

The charity releases the list to raise awareness of the “value that historic places bring to quality of life, local identity and cultural vitality.” In choosing the sites for the list, the organization measures a place’s significance, the severity of the threat it faces and how much work has been done to protect it.

This year’s list, released on Thursday, includes Vancouver’s Chinatown, which the organization says is at risk of losing its unique character.

“Relentless development threatens the physical fabric of this nationally significant urban cultural landscape,” the charity states on its website. It adds that “intense speculation” has raised rents and displaced long-time residents.